Trafalgar Falls

When we finally explored Dominica our first stop was the town of Roseau from there we headed out to Trafalgar Falls almsot directly inland from Roseau and one of the country’s national parks. Our first mission was to get to Trafalgar, the village near the falls, by bus rather than taxi as I do like using the community busses and a taxi would have been massively more expensive, $40US compared to the 8EC $ it cost us on the bus. The only downfall was having to wait till the bus filled up before we left, adding about 30 mins to our journey, but we were in no hurry so it was worth the wait.

Once in Trafalgar our driver drove us up to the hydroelectric station at the bottom of the path to the falls entrance, slightly off the normal route as we would have to walk into the village to get the bus back. The path to the falls entrance is one of the steepest roads I have climbed to date, but at least it wasn’t too long. Once there we bought our week tickets which would get us into any of Dominica’s national parks for the next week, filled up our bottles with more water from their outside tap and prepared to head onto the trail.

image

The first part of the trail was fairly easy to navigate with steps made in the trail, there is a viewing platform half way down the trail here we stopped and took some photos of the two waterfalls and a nice but slightly too enthusiastic American man took some photos of us together infront of the falls which was very appreciated as it is hard to get photos of both of us together.

image

The second half of the path was harder work right from the very start, when stepping down from the viewing platform the top step was missing, from there we had to climb over boulders to get down to the level of the river. From there we had a gorgeous view of the two falls, and then headed up towards the nearer of the two, which required a lot of climbing.

image

Climbing up to the base of the falls was interesting for me, Edward is much more used to this kind of thing and had to wait for me a lot and some of the time took much more complicated routes than I did just for the hell of it.

image

Once at the bottom of the falls we were sprayed by the water from the fall which was very cooling as it was a very hot day. From here Edward climbed to the other side of the falls to take a picture of me from a distace, and got some good views of the falls too.

image

image

image

Climbing back to my side of the falls turned out to be a bit harder than Edward had though as the rocks were slippery. I ended up having to go part the way across to get my camera from him so that he could climb up a section that he didnt really want to attemp with my ‘nice’ DSLR. Althoughhedid cross the river on this log!

image

Whilst Edward was doing this I was joined by a few Aussie’s who turned out to be anchored just next to us in Roseau and on the group tour that Pancho had arranged that we spoke to before we left the bar in the morning, even Dominica is a small place… from here we climbed down the boulder field as far as the path to the visitors center. Here we stopped for lunch, one of the most impressive settings I have ever had lunch in!

image

After lunch I managed to convice Edward that we should have a soak in the hot sulfur springs which were at the side of the river, I do have to admit he was not that convinced and found it very weird to be climbing into hot water when the day was so warm, so he went off to find us a place to climb into the river afterwards to cool down before climbing into the hot pool.

image

image

The section that we chose in the river was very cut off from the rest of the river, where everyone joins the trail. This meant that we could chill out here, literally, for quite a while feeling very cut off from the worl which was amazing. But the river was very cold, giving us brain freeze if our heads went under.

image

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s